By Mikki Sciba

Have you ever eaten too much food and felt bad afterwards? Or have you felt really angry and acted out by yelling or throwing a fit? Sometimes people struggle with controlling what they do and how they feel. The virtue of temperance is about practicing self-control. It helps you control your actions, thoughts, and feelings. Our bodies need things that help it grow and flourish like food, water, exercise, and rest. Temperance helps you balance what your body needs without having too much or too little of it.

By Mikki Sciba

If you have ever watched a football game you know that the goal of the game is for your team to get the ball across your goal line, a touchdown. You also know that the person who is running with the football has many players from the other team trying to stop him and take him down. The other team does not want your team to reach the goal line and will make it difficult for your team to reach its goal. This is also true in our lives. We have a goal and things will make that difficult to accomplish. This is why we need fortitude.

By Allsion Tobola Low, M.D.

Who is Jesus Christ? When we profess the Nicene Creed, we declare that Jesus is uncreated, of the same divine substance as God the Father, eternal, truly God and that he became man. The Church also teaches in the Catechism of the Catholic Church that “Jesus Christ is true God and true man” (464). In hearing this, we proclaim, “Amen!” But do we know what these statements mean?

By Mikki Sciba

Have you ever owed someone something? If you have, this means you have an obligation or responsibility to repay him or give him his due. Did you also know that you have a responsibility to give God and others their due? Yes, you owe God and others something. I’m not talking about money but about the responsibilities you have to God and other people. Justice is the virtue of giving each person what is owed to him. Practicing the virtue of justice helps you give to God what belongs to God and give to others what belongs to them.

By Allsion Tobola Low, M.D.

In the Catechism of the Catholic Church we are taught that the central mystery of the faith, the fundamental and essential teaching of Christianity, is the doctrine of the Trinity (CCC 234). This is the revelation that our Almighty Creator is one God in three Persons: the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. This is a mystery inaccessible to our finite human reason alone, but God has lovingly unveiled this truth about his inner life to us.